obon:

Most Hopeful Energy Developments of 2011

obon:

  • 1. Aerosol cans: They may be made of metal, but they’re also filled with chemicals and propellants. Many municipal systems treat them as hazardous material.
  • 2. Batteries: These need to be handled separately from curbside recycling and trash.
  • 3. Household glass: This one is tricky. You…
stoweboyd:

Swedish eco-designers, Ehrnberg Solutions AB, have just completed their most successful prototype of the floating SeaTwirl vertical wind turbine. The device captures and harvests offshore wind, without having to convert the energy as it is being stored. SeaTwirl is the first of its kind with only two moving parts, and it uses only sea water as a roller bearing, omitting the need for a gearbox or transmission. (via SeaTwirl Turbine Could be the Most Cost-Effective Wind Energy Generator Yet | Inhabitat - Green Design Will Save the World)

stoweboyd:

Swedish eco-designers, Ehrnberg Solutions AB, have just completed their most successful prototype of the floating SeaTwirl vertical wind turbine. The device captures and harvests offshore wind, without having to convert the energy as it is being stored. SeaTwirl is the first of its kind with only two moving parts, and it uses only sea water as a roller bearing, omitting the need for a gearbox or transmission. (via SeaTwirl Turbine Could be the Most Cost-Effective Wind Energy Generator Yet | Inhabitat - Green Design Will Save the World)

plantedcity:

Free Download: ‘Culture and Behavior: The Human Nature of Unsustainability’
Over the last year or so the Post Carbon Institute has been releasing individual chapters of its best-selling Post Carbon Reader as free downloads. I picked up a copy in the spring and have since found it to be a great resource for learning more about the many complex and interconnected dimensions (e.g. food, climate, energy, cities, water, economics) of our global sustainability crisis. 
Today, the PCI recently released a new chapter, ‘Culture and Behavior: The Human Nature of Unsustainability’, written by ecological footprint co-inventor William Rees. Here’s an excerpt:

Humans may pride themselves as being the best evidence for intelligent life on Earth, but an alien observer would record that the (un)sustainability conundrum has the global community floundering in a swamp of cognitive dissonance and collective denial… Indeed, our alien friend might go so far as to ask why our reasonably intelligent species seems unable to recognize the crisis for what it is and respond accordingly. 
To begin answering this question, we need to look beyond conventional explanations—scientific uncertainty, societal inertia, lack of political will, resistance by vested interests, and so on — to what may well be the root cause of the conundrum: human nature itself.

You can download the chapter here and previously released chapters here. 
Finally, for those interested in the relationship between culture and sustainability you may want to check out the following resources:
‘Are we trapped in a cultural mythology that undermines sustainable development?’ by Arish Dastur (World Bank blog)
‘Finding cultural values that can transform the climate change debate’ by Tom Crompton (Solutions Journal)
‘Overcoming systemic roadblocks to sustainability: The evolutionary redesign of worldviews, institutions and technologies’ (PDF) by Beddoe et al. (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences)

plantedcity:

Free Download: ‘Culture and Behavior: The Human Nature of Unsustainability’

Over the last year or so the Post Carbon Institute has been releasing individual chapters of its best-selling Post Carbon Reader as free downloads. I picked up a copy in the spring and have since found it to be a great resource for learning more about the many complex and interconnected dimensions (e.g. food, climate, energy, cities, water, economics) of our global sustainability crisis. 

Today, the PCI recently released a new chapter, ‘Culture and Behavior: The Human Nature of Unsustainability’, written by ecological footprint co-inventor William Rees. Here’s an excerpt:

Humans may pride themselves as being the best evidence for intelligent life on Earth, but an alien observer would record that the (un)sustainability conundrum has the global community floundering in a swamp of cognitive dissonance and collective denial… Indeed, our alien friend might go so far as to ask why our reasonably intelligent species seems unable to recognize the crisis for what it is and respond accordingly. 

To begin answering this question, we need to look beyond conventional explanations—scientific uncertainty, societal inertia, lack of political will, resistance by vested interests, and so on — to what may well be the root cause of the conundrum: human nature itself.

You can download the chapter here and previously released chapters here.

Finally, for those interested in the relationship between culture and sustainability you may want to check out the following resources:

  1. ‘Are we trapped in a cultural mythology that undermines sustainable development?’ by Arish Dastur (World Bank blog)
  2. Finding cultural values that can transform the climate change debate’ by Tom Crompton (Solutions Journal)
  3. ‘Overcoming systemic roadblocks to sustainability: The evolutionary redesign of worldviews, institutions and technologies’ (PDF) by Beddoe et al. (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences)
mothernaturenetwork:

3 fresh online boutiques that only stock eco-friendly fashionsIn a sartorial rut? Check these Web outposts for timely, affordable clothing that’s easy on the Earth.

mothernaturenetwork:

3 fresh online boutiques that only stock eco-friendly fashions
In a sartorial rut? Check these Web outposts for timely, affordable clothing that’s easy on the Earth.

Lesson: Cut back. 

Lesson: Cut back. 

Today is Earth Overshoot Day!

wwf:

What does that mean?

Well, according to data from the Global Footprint Network, humanity is surpassing nature’s budget for the year, and is now operating in overdraft.

They say:

Similar to the way a bank statement tracks income against expenditures, Global Footprint Network tracks human demand on nature (for example, for providing food, producing raw materials and absorbing CO2) against nature’s capacity to regenerate those resources and absorb the waste. Its calculations show that, in approximately nine months, we have surpassed a level of demand on resources that the planet would be able to sustainably support this year. 

For the rest of the year, we will maintain our ecological deficit by depleting resource stocks and accumulating CO2 in the atmosphere. 

Read More

mothernaturenetwork:

The Aral Sea is the poster child for large, dried-up bodies of water. If you travel to the Aral Sea, which sits on the border between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, you’ll find a disconnected collection of small ponds of sea water sitting in a dusty bowl that held what used to be one large body of water.7 lakes and rivers that are drying up

mothernaturenetwork:

The Aral Sea is the poster child for large, dried-up bodies of water. If you travel to the Aral Sea, which sits on the border between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, you’ll find a disconnected collection of small ponds of sea water sitting in a dusty bowl that held what used to be one large body of water.
7 lakes and rivers that are drying up

O’YEA! - Puma’s 100% Recycled Shoe

obon:

http://bit.ly/n59O9n

This is the Puma “Re-Suede,” a retooled version of the brand’s signature shoe, now made from 100% recycled materials. Instead of animal suede, it uses a synthetic material made from recycled polyester fibers. The outsole is made from a combination of recycled rubber and rice husk filler,

But the eco benefits of these redesigned kicks don’t stop there. Click on the link to find out more!

Photo credit & article source: Earth 911

Awesome! Adding Puma to the list!

CTA Rail Car Converted into Mobile Garden

train garden